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As the lead law enforcement agency for investigating acts of domestic and international terrorism, the FBI relies on a vast array of partnerships across the nation and around the world to disrupt and defeat terrorists. These relationships have been steadily enhanced through a series of groundbreaking initiatives since September 11.

Joint Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs)
JTTFs are teams of state and local law enforcement officers, FBI Agents, and other federal agents and personnel who work shoulder-to-shoulder to investigate and prevent acts of terrorism. These task forces are important “force multipliers” in the war on terror, pooling multi-agency expertise and ensuring the timely
collection and sharing of intelligence absolutely critical to prevention efforts. Although the first JTTF came into being in 1980, the total number of task forces has nearly doubled since September 11, 2001. Today, there are 66 JTTFs, including one in each of the FBI’s 56 main field offices and ten in smaller offices. More than 2,300 personnel work on these task forces nationwide.

National Joint Terrorism Task Force (National JTTF)
In 2002, the FBI created a National Joint Terrorism Task Force at its command center in Washington, D.C. Nearly 30 agencies are represented, spanning the fields of intelligence, public safety, and federal, state, and local law enforcement. The National JTTF collects terrorism information and intelligence and funnels it to the 66 JTTFs, various terrorism units within the FBI, and partner agencies. Agency representatives also help the FBI with terrorism investigations.

Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force (FTTTF)
In October 2001, the Attorney General created the FTTTF at the direction of the President. It is composed of representatives of the FBI, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Customs Service, and other federal agencies. Combining information, expertise, and technology, members of the FTTTF work together to prevent known terrorists and suspects from entering the U.S. and to track down those who do manage to come into this country. As of January 2003, the FTTTF has identified more than 200 terrorists or suspects.

Office of Law Enforcement Coordination
In December 2001, Director Mueller announced the creation of a new office within the Bureau to improve longstanding relationships with state, municipal, county, and tribal law enforcement on a national level. Lou Quijas, a former police chief, was selected to head the office. Recognizing that state and local police officers outnumber FBI Agents 60 to 1, the FBI is committed to folding its law enforcement partners into the war on terror by sharing information more fully and coordinating more closely. This office serves as a cornerstone of that effort, helping the FBI open channels of communication and be more responsive to the needs of law enforcement at the state and local levels.

The National Intel Share (NIS) Project
The NIS Project, headed by a Bureau executive, is dedicated to bolstering the FBI’s ability to exchange sensitive information with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. A key effort is the Joint Terrorism Task Force Information Sharing Initiative, a pilot project in St. Louis that is bringing together data from computer systems of the FBI and its partners into a single, searchable data warehouse. It will be tested in five other FBI field offices and promises to bring a new level of connectivity to the government in the war on terror.

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