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Grades
K-3  |  4-6  |  7-8  |  9-12

Grades K-3

Create a Schoolyard Habitat

Presented by the National Wildlife Federation, this program encourages students, educators, and community members to learn about wildlife conservation by creating habitats for local wildlife on school grounds.  Over 825 schools nationwide are certified.  Learn how to start this program at your school, look at several active sites, and read about success stories from other schools.

Earth Day Links from EELink

Earth Day is April 22, but everyday can be Earth Day in your classroom, with help from this great page from Environmental Education on the Internet (EELink).  This directory links to dozens of sites on the Web that offer projects, activities, and ideas for celebrating this important event, and for educating kids about the importance of conserving and protecting our natural resources.

Earthwatch Global Classroom

The Earthwatch Institute provides a host of opportunities for teaching science in the classroom.  This site provides information about Earthwatch Fellowships for K-12 teachers to participate in Earthwatch expeditions; Student Challenge Award Programs to reward gifted science students with research opportunities; resources for the classroom; and virtual field trips.

Endangered Species Kids' Corner

From the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, this site provides games, activities, fact sheets, and other educational projects for kids to complete in the classroom.  It also offers teachers a wealth of online resources to help in teaching about endangered species and conservation.

The GLOBE Program

The GLOBE Programs brings together K-12 students and their teachers with scientists from around the world to learn more about our global environment.  Students make scientific measurements for a host of environmental parameters, and then share their data on the Internet, where it is used by scientists and other students.  Areas of interest on the site include:  The GLOBE Teachers' Guide; Student Investigations; the Scientists' Corner; GLOBE Data; and Data Exchange.  The GLOBE Program is an interagency initiative, whose members include NOAA, NASA, EPA, NSF, the Dept. of Education, and major research universities across the country.

Join Our Pest Patrol: A Backyard Activity Book for Kids

Coloring sheets, accompanied by fast-facts, quizzes, and helpful tips, teach kids about invasive and nuisance plants and animals, the differences between pest and useful species, pesticide safety, and the web of life. A brief teacher's guide is also included. Developed by the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture.

Kids' Planet

From Defenders of Wildlife, this site is full of materials for kids and teachers. Get fabulous, comprehensive, yet easy-to-read fact sheets for dozens of species around the globe; access an entire wolf curriculum, using the World-Wide Wolves interactive site; read an online story about the "Web of Life"; get hands-on classroom activities that help children learn what they personally can do to defend wildlife; and get entertaining and educational online games about wildlife.

The Learning Place

From the National Park Service, a single location for finding all the education- and interpretation-related materials for teaching about America's natural and cultural heritage through the National Parks.  Almost all of the 375 sites found in the National Park System offer some type of interpretive or educational program. These may range from publications, video presentations, and guided walks and talks to extensive curriculum- based education programs.

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administrations' Kids' & Teachers' Corner

A host of activities related to threatened & endangered marine species are available on this site: 25 Things You Can Do to Save the Coral Reefs; games and projects; links for students and teachers; seals & sea lions; fact sheets; coloring books; protecting our coasts; a U.S. Coast Guard Kids' Activity Book; Project Oceanography; and much more.

Project WILD

A program of the Council for Environmental Education, Project WILD is one of the most widely used conservation and environmental education programs among educators of students in kindergarten through high school. Project WILD is based on the premise that young people and educators have a vital interest in learning about our natural world. The program emphasizes wildlife--because of its intrinsic and ecological values, as well as its importance as a basis for teaching how ecosystems function. Project WILD addresses the need for human beings to develop as responsible citizens of our planet. It has provided workshops and materials (Project WILD K-12 Activity Guide and Project WILD Aquatic Education Activity Guide), focusing on hands-on, activity-based, environmental education, to over 550,000 educators.

Rainforest: An Earth Day Creative Drama Performance

In this activity, students are each assigned a sound heard in the rainforest: an insect, bird, mammal, water falling, trees blowing, bulldozers, fire. They are invited to create a symphony of sounds that are then removed one by one, to mimic rainforest destruction.

The Wild Ones

A project of the Wildlife Preservation Trust International, this site offers both a student and a teacher interface, and is also available in Spanish. Students can learn about endangered animals around the world, and the scientists charged with protecting and preserving them, as well as obtain project ideas and read the online newsletter. Teachers can obtain curriculum guides and resources, as well as correspondwith the producers of the site.

|Back to Top|


Grades 4-6

Bridging the Watershed

Bridging the Watershed (BTW) is one of five "National Park Labs" programs that promotes national parks as learning laboratories and provides a model that can be replicated in other parks and watersheds. The program is based in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. BTW partners share a fundamental goal to educate the public about the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay watersheds in order to heighten awareness and develop stewardship for these resources. High school students can focus on five modules: water quality of the river and its tributaries; runoff and sedimentation; assessing the health of the waterway by observing the presence of macroinvertebrates; invasive alien plants; and trash in the watershed. Students of all ages can learn to identify types of plants and aquatic invertebrates; trace the journey of anadromous fish; and learn about service projects that can help them make a real difference in their communities. Students can also collect data to be uploaded and shared on the site. For both Washington DC region teachers, and teachers in other areas who can use this site as a blueprint for their own local projects, this site is full of great ideas for classroom study and fieldwork.

Create a Schoolyard Habitat

Presented by the National Wildlife Federation, this program encourages students, educators, and community members to learn about wildlife conservation by creating habitats for local wildlife on school grounds.  Over 825 schools nationwide are certified.  Learn how to start this program at your school, look at several active sites, and read about success stories from other schools.

Earth Day Links from EELink

Earth Day is April 22, but everyday can be Earth Day in your classroom, with help from this great page from Environmental Education on the Internet (EELink).  This directory links to dozens of sites on the Web that offer projects, activities, and ideas for celebrating this important event, and educating kids about the importance of conserving and protecting our wonderful natural resources.

Earthwatch Global Classroom

The Earthwatch Institute provides a host of opportunities for teaching science in the classroom.  This site provides information about Earthwatch Fellowships for K-12 teachers to participate in Earthwatch expeditions; Student Challenge Award Programs to reward gifted science students with research opportunities; resources for the classroom; and virtual field trips.

Endangered Species Kids' Corner

From the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, this site provides games, activities, fact sheets, and other educational projects for kids to complete in the classroom.  It also offers teachers a wealth of online resources to help in teaching about endangered species and conservation.

Endangered Species Learning Center

This site, from Defenders of Wildlife, provides an "Endangered Species Primer," a basic introduction to the concept of endangered species and the Endangered Species Act.  Also included are useful individual fact sheets on many threatened and endangered species; that provide helpful background material for teachers.

The GLOBE Program

The GLOBE Programs brings together K-12 students and their teachers with scientists from around the world to learn more about our global environment.  Students make scientific measurements for a host of environmental parameters, and then share their data on the Internet, where it is used by scientists and other students.  Areas of interest on the site include:  The GLOBE Teachers' Guide; Student Investigations; the Scientists' Corner; GLOBE Data; and Data Exchange.  The GLOBE Program is an interagency initiative, whose members include NOAA, NASA, EPA, NSF, the Dept. of Education, and major research universities across the country.

Join Our Pest Patrol: A Backyard Activity Book for Kids

Coloring sheets, accompanied by fast-facts, quizzes, and helpful tips, teach kids about invasive and nuisance plants and animals, the differences between pest and useful species, pesticide safety, and the web of life. A brief teacher's guide is also included. Developed by the Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture.

Journey North:   A Global Study of Wildlife Migration

This award-winning site, involving over 4500 schools across North America, invites students to track the journeys of a dozen migratory species each spring.  Students share their regional observations online and with scientists, who provide their expertise to students. The students record changes in daylight hours, temperature, and natural activities.  Lessons and projects are also provided. This is a wonderful year-long project for classes. Teachers can register online for this free program.

Kids Do Ecology

The National Center for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis, and the Los Marineros Program provide this selection of educational activities related to marine ecology, geology, politics, and history.

Kids' Planet

From Defenders of Wildlife, this site is full of materials for kids and teachers. Get fabulous, comprehensive, yet easy-to-read fact sheets for dozens of species around the globe; access an entire wolf curriculum, using the World-Wide Wolves interactive site; read an online story about the "Web of Life"; get hands-on classroom activities that help children learn what they personally can do to defend wildlife; and get entertaining and educational online games about wildlife.

The Learning Place

From the National Park Service, a single location for finding all the education- and interpretation-related materials for teaching about America's natural and cultural heritage through the National Parks.  Almost all of the 375 sites found in the National Park System offer some type of interpretive or educational program. These may range from publications, video presentations, and guided walks and talks to extensive curriculum-based education programs. 

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administrations' Kids' & Teachers' Corner

A host of activities related to threatened & endangered marine species are available on this site:  25 Things You Can Do to Save the Coral Reefs; games and projects; links for students and teachers; seals & sea lions; fact sheets; coloring books; protecting our coasts; a U.S. Coast Guard Kids' Activity Book; Project Oceanography; and much more.

Project WILD

A program of the Council for Environmental Education, Project WILD is one of the most widely used conservation and environmental education programs among educators of students in kindergarten through high school. Project WILD is based on the premise that young people and educators have a vital interest in learning about our natural world. The program emphasizes wildlife--because of its intrinsic and ecological values, as well as its importance as a basis for teaching how ecosystems function. Project WILD addresses the need for human beings to develop as responsible citizens of our planet. It has provided workshops and materials (Project WILD K-12 Activity Guide and Project WILD Aquatic Education Activity Guide), focusing on hands-on, activity-based, environmental education, to over 550,000 educators.

The Wild Ones

A project of the Wildlife Preservation Trust International, this site offers both a student and a teacher interface, and is also available in Spanish. Students can learn about endangered animals around the world, and the scientists charged with protecting and preserving them, as well as obtain project ideas and read the online newsletter. Teachers can obtain curriculum guides and resources, as well as correspond with the producers of the site.

|Back to Top|


Grades 7-8

Bridging the Watershed

Bridging the Watershed (BTW) is one of five "National Park Labs" programs that promotes national parks as learning laboratories and provides a model that can be replicated in other parks and watersheds. The program is based in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. BTW partners share a fundamental goal to educate the public about the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay watersheds in order to heighten awareness and develop stewardship for these resources. High school students can focus on five modules: water quality of the river and its tributaries; runoff and sedimentation; assessing the health of the waterway by observing the presence of macroinvertebrates; invasive alien plants; and trash in the watershed. Students of all ages can learn to identify types of plants and aquatic invertebrates; trace the journey of anadromous fish; and learn about service projects that can help them make a real difference in their communities. Students can also collect data to be uploaded and shared on the site. For both Washington DC region teachers, and teachers in other areas who can use this site as a blueprint for their own local projects, this site is full of great ideas for classroom study and fieldwork.

Create a Schoolyard Habitat

Presented by the National Wildlife Federation, this program encourages students, educators, and community members to learn about wildlife conservation by creating habitats for local wildlife on school grounds.  Over 825 schools nationwide are certified.  Learn how to start this program at your school, look at several active sites, and read about success stories from other schools.

Earth Day Links from EELink

Earth Day is April 22, but everyday can be Earth Day in your classroom, with help from this great page from Environmental Education on the Internet (EELink).  This directory links to dozens of sites on the Web that offer projects, activities, and ideas for celebrating this important event, and educating kids about the importance of conserving and protecting our wonderful natural resources.

Earthwatch Global Classroom

The Earthwatch Institute provides a host of opportunities for teaching science in the classroom. This site provides information about Earthwatch Fellowships for K-12 teachers to participate in Earthwatch expeditions; Student Challenge Award Programs to reward gifted science students with research opportunities; resources for the classroom; and virtual field trips.

Endangered Species in Endangered Spaces

From the Royal British Columbia Museum in Canada, this Internet exhibit provides information on some of the rare and endangered plants and animals in the Thompson-Okanagan region of British Columbia.

Endangered Species Kids' Corner

From the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, this site provides games, activities, fact sheets, and other educational projects for kids to complete in the classroom. It also offers teachers a wealth of online resources to help in teaching about endangered species and conservation.

The GLOBE Program

The GLOBE Programs brings together K-12 students and their teachers with scientists from around the world to learn more about our global environment. Students make scientific measurements for a host of environmental parameters, and then share their data on the Internet, where it is used by scientists and other students. Areas of interest on the site include: The GLOBE Teachers' Guide; Student Investigations; the Scientists' Corner; GLOBE Data; and Data Exchange. The GLOBE Program is an interagency initiative, whose members include NOAA, NASA, EPA, NSF, the Dept. of Education, and major research universities across the country.

Journey North: A Global Study of Wildlife Migration

This award-winning site, involving over 4500 schools across North America, invites students to track the journeys of a dozen migratory species each spring. Students share their regional observations online and with scientists, who provide their expertise to students. The students record changes in daylight hours, temperature, and natural activities. Lessons and projects are also provided. This is a wonderful year-long project for classes. Teachers can register online for this free program.

Kids' Planet

From Defenders of Wildlife, this site is full of materials for kids and teachers. Get fabulous, comprehensive, yet easy-to-read fact sheets for dozens of species around the globe; access an entire wolf curriculum, using the World-Wide Wolves interactive site; read an online story about the "Web of Life"; get hands-on classroom activities that help children learn what they personally can do to defend wildlife; and get entertaining and educational online games about wildlife.

Learning for a Sustainable Future

Learning for a Sustainable Future is a Canadian nonprofit organization whose mandate is to work with educators from across Canada to integrate the concepts and principles of sustainable development into the curricula at all grade levels. Thematic and curricular activities are offered, as well as links to similar sites.  Available in both English and French.

The Learning Place

From the National Park Service, a single location for finding all the education-and-interpretation-related materials for teaching about America's natural and cultural heritage through the National Parks. Almost all of the 375 sites found in the National Park System offer some type of interpretive or educational program. These may range from publications, video presentations, and guided walks and talks to extensive curriculum-based education programs.

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administrations' Kids' & Teachers' Corner

A host of activities related to threatened & endangered marine species are available on this site: 25 Things You Can Do to Save the Coral Reefs; games and projects; links for students and teachers; seals & sea lions; fact sheets; coloring books; protecting our coasts; a U.S. Coast Guard Kids' Activity Book; Project Oceanography; and much more.

Project WILD

A program of the Council for Environmental Education, Project WILD is one of the most widely used conservation and environmental education programs among educators of students in kindergarten through high school. Project WILD is based on the premise that young people and educators have a vital interest in learning about our natural world. The program emphasizes wildlife--because of its intrinsic and ecological values, as well as its importance as a basis for teaching how ecosystems function. Project WILD addresses the need for human beings to develop as responsible citizens of our planet. It has provided workshops and materials (Project WILD K-12 Activity Guide and Project WILD Aquatic Education Activity Guide), focusing on hands-on, activity-based, environmental education, to more than 550,000 educators.

Understanding Ecosystem Management

From the Bureau of Land Management's Environmental Education Page, this curriculum offers a balanced introduction to the issues of ecosystem management. It provides concise discussion of major points such as ecosystem monitoring, human effects on ecosystems, and prehistoric parallels. It also includes suggestions for classroom activities and discussions.

The Wild Ones

A project of the Wildlife Preservation Trust International, this site offers both a student and a teacher interface, and is also available in Spanish. Students can learn about endangered animals around the world, and the scientists charged with protecting and preserving them, as well as obtain project ideas and read the online newsletter. Teachers can obtain curriculum guides and resources, as well as correspond with the producers of the site.

|Back to Top|


Grades 9-12

Bagheera

Bagheera is built around a set of stand-alone modules, each designed to either provide information about an endangered species, or to take action against their destruction. Curriculum information focuses on conservation biology and past extinctions, using case studies, spotlights, and activities.  The site also features links and an endangered species database.

Bridging the Watershed

Bridging the Watershed (BTW) is one of five "National Park Labs" programs that promotes national parks as learning laboratories and provides a model that can be replicated in other parks and watersheds. The program is based in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. BTW partners share a fundamental goal to educate the public about the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay watersheds in order to heighten awareness and develop stewardship for these resources. High school students can focus on five modules: water quality of the river and its tributaries; runoff and sedimentation; assessing the health of the waterway by observing the presence of macroinvertebrates; invasive alien plants; and trash in the watershed. Students of all ages can learn to identify types of plants and aquatic invertebrates; trace the journey of anadromous fish; and learn about service projects that can help them make a real difference in their communities. Students can also collect data to be uploaded and shared on the site. For both Washington DC region teachers, and teachers in other areas who can use this site as a blueprint for their own local projects, this site is full of great ideas for classroom study and fieldwork.

Earth Day Links from EELink

Earth Day is April 22, but everyday can be Earth Day in your classroom, with help from this great page from Environmental Education on the Internet (EELink).  This directory links to dozens of sites on the Web that offer projects, activities, and ideas for celebrating this important event, and educating kids about the importance of conserving and protecting our wonderful natural resources.

Earthwatch Global Classroom

The Earthwatch Institute provides a host of opportunities for teaching science in the classroom.  This site provides information about Earthwatch Fellowships for K-12 teachers to participate in Earthwatch expeditions; Student Challenge Award Programs to reward gifted science students with research opportunities; resources for the classroom; and virtual field trips.

Endangered Species in Endangered Spaces

From the Royal British Columbia Museum in Canada, this Internet exhibit provides information on some of the rare and endangered plants and animals in the Thompson-Okanagan region of British Columbia.

The GLOBE Program

The GLOBE Programs brings together K-12 students and their teachers with scientists from around the world to learn more about our global environment.  Students make scientific measurements for a host of environmental parameters, and then share their data on the Internet, where it is used by scientists and other students.  Areas of interest on the site include:  The GLOBE Teachers' Guide; Student Investigations; the Scientists' Corner; GLOBE Data; and Data Exchange.  The GLOBE Program is an interagency initiative, whose members include NOAA, NASA, EPA, NSF, the Dept. of Education, and major research universities across the country.

Learning for a Sustainable Future

Learning for a Sustainable Future is a Canadian nonprofit organization whose mandate is to work with educators from across Canada to integrate the concepts and principles of sustainable development into the curricula at all grade levels. Thematic and curricular activities are offered, as well as links to similar sites. Available in both English and French.

The Learning Place

From the National Park Service, a single location for finding all the education-and-interpretation-related materials for teaching about America's natural and cultural heritage through the National Parks. Almost all of the 375 sites found in the National Park System offer some type of interpretive or educational program. These may range from publications, video presentations, and guided walks and talks to extensive curriculum- based education programs.

Project WILD

A program of the Council for Environmental Education, Project WILD is one of the most widely used conservation and environmental education programs among educators of students in kindergarten through high school. Project WILD is based on the premise that young people and educators have a vital interest in learning about our natural world. The program emphasizes wildlife--because of its intrinsic and ecological values, as well as its importance as a basis for teaching how ecosystems function. Project WILD addresses the need for human beings to develop as responsible citizens of our planet. It has provided workshops and materials (Project WILD K-12 Activity Guide and Project WILD Aquatic Education Activity Guide), focusing on hands-on, activity-based, environmental education, to more than 550,000 educators.

Resorces Himalaya

This website contains biodiversity information about Nepal. Comprehensive butterfly checklists, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Land use and elevation maps of Nepal are also highlighted.

Restoring Nature

From a graduate seminar at the University of Wisconsin focused on the philosophic, historic, ecological, and political aspects of ecological restoration, this site features a portfolio of problem-based learning units on restoration of wolves, prairies, rivers & watersheds, forests, salmon, and other species and ecosystems.

Understanding Ecosystem Management

From the Bureau of Land Management's Environmental Education Page, this curriculum offers a balanced introduction to the issues of ecosystem management. It provides concise discussion of major points such as ecosystem monitoring, human effects on ecosystems, and prehistoric parallels. It also includes suggestions for classroom activities and discussions.

|Back to Top|

 

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