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The FBI’s ability to collect information – whether through physical surveillance, electronic surveillance, or human source development – represents one of its greatest weapons in the war on terror. The FBI has an enormous network of informants and sources that place it at the forefront of intelligence and evidence collection. By constantly interacting with witnesses and potential sources in the course of their daily duties, FBI Agents have unmatched expertise in assessing, recruiting, and cultivating human sources, skills that are critical to preventing terrorist attacks and disrupting terrorist networks. The following are key initiatives undertaken in recent months to improve FBI intelligence and analytical capacities in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

Office of Intelligence
This new office is the centerpiece of the FBI’s efforts to upgrade its analytical and intelligence capabilities so that it can prevent acts of terror. This office will work to create professional development opportunities for analysts and ensure that quality analytical products and intelligence are shared both inside and outside the FBI. Since the events of September 11, the FBI has quadrupled the number of strategic analysts at Headquarters specifically focused on international terrorism, and it plans to build a cadre of more than 700 analysts nationwide in the next few years. The FBI has also hired new “reports officers” who are highly trained in identifying intelligence, distilling key facts, and getting information into the hands of those who need it. In addition, the FBI has developed new technologies for its analysts and brought on board 25 seasoned intelligence officers from the CIA to work side-by-side with FBI personnel.

Counterterrorism Watch (CT Watch)
CT Watch is the FBI’s 24-hour global command center for terrorism prevention operations. Staffed by highly trained and experienced personnel and using sophisticated technology, it is the focal point within the FBI for gathering and managing all domestic and international terrorism threats. Incoming threats are given an initial review by CT Watch staff; those deemed credible are passed on to FBI investigators for urgent action. CT Watch also produces daily terrorism threat briefing materials and intelligence reports that are shared with the President, key national security policy makers, and members of the intelligence and law enforcement communities. Since September 11, 2001, the FBI has responded to more than 3,000 terrorist threats.

College of Analytical Studies
The FBI has created a College of Analytical Studies at the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia. Through this College, the FBI has revamped its approach to training analysts with a six-week program modeled on the CIA’s highly respected Kent School.

Document Exploitation (DocEx) Working Group
As a result of military and intelligence actions in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and elsewhere, a massive amount of paper documents, electronic media, video and audiotapes, and electronic equipment have been seized. The FBI, CIA, NSA, and DIA have established a coordinated effort – the DocEx Working Group – to analyze these materials quickly and effectively. This effort has yielded a wealth of valuable intelligence on terrorist activities and capabilities and has generated more than 10,000 new investigative leads.

Intelligence-Law Enforcement Coordination
The PATRIOT Act and a federal court decision in November 2002 have broken down what has been known as “the Wall” that legally separated law enforcement and intelligence functions. As a result, coordination and information sharing between the law enforcement community and intelligence agencies have been greatly improved. Since the attacks of September 11, the cultural and operational wall between the FBI and CIA has also been broken down, with the two agencies becoming integrated at virtually every level of operation.

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